Friday, May 6, 2016

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The Minnesota Vikings have had 34 quarterbacks start games for this illustrious franchise. Andy ranks them #1 all the way through #34. There are a few Hot Takes in the rankings, most notably who’s at #32, #7, and #2 overall. (That’s a tease)

The Ranking Criteria Include (But are not limited to):
• Statistics
• Short Greatness vs Extended Averageness
• Lofty Expectations vs None
• The Grandma Scale™
• Andy’s Personal Opinion

So enjoy the rankings! If you agree or disagree, please let us know in the comment section or hit me up on Twitter @AndyCarlsonShow or @PurpleForTheWin!

An Andy Carlson Joint.

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Images courtesy of Vikings.com

Hating Brett Favre wasn’t a choice; it was an innate fire, burning brighter with each loss to the man in the green and gold No. 4 jersey. Deadspin’s Drew Magary put it best in 2008 when he wrote:

“I have spent the past 15 years nursing my blind hatred for Brett Favre.” 

Blind, unwarranted, inexplainable. Why did we spend so many years rooting against Brett Favre? Was it because we watched the organization struggle with quarterbacks like Daunte Culpepper, Brad Johnson, and Tarvaris Jackson under center? Was it because Favre succeeded where the Vikings had so tragically failed — the Super Bowl? Or, was it because Favre took the Vikings to new heights in 2009, only to bring them crashing down with one ill-advised throw across his body?

The collective hate is a metaphor for the longstanding Vikings-Packers rivalry, which started in 1961 and has only become more heated in recent years. All-time, the Packers lead the series 58-49-2, with Brett Favre accounting for 17 of those wins. Some not-so-fond Favre memories include the Antonio Freeman miracle catch in 2000, the last-second touchdown heave in 1999, and his record-breaking touchdown throw to Greg Jennings in 2007.

Simply put, Brett Favre spent the majority of his career bringing pain and suffering upon the Vikings. His path of destruction, though, was a path to one of the greatest careers in NFL history. Favre has thrown and completed the most passes (10,169 and 6,300), thrown for the most yards (71,838) and trails only Peyton Manning in total touchdown passes (508). With numbers like that, it should come as no surprise that Teddy Bridgewater, the Vikings’ quarterback of the future, aspires to follow in Brett Favre’s footsteps.

Say what?

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Image courtesy of Vikings.com

As someone that now qualifies as a father (actually, very recently, a father of three), I’m hard pressed to think of a better way to celebrate Father’s Day than to be surrounded by Vikings players and cheerleaders, enjoying some great Minnesota weather and food, and doing something genuinely awesome that helps support a great cause.

If that sounds like something you also would be interested in, and you happen to be in the Minnesota area, then I highly recommend planning to attend the 9th Annual Gridiron Gallop presented by Vikings linebacker Chad Greenway and his wife, Jenni.

There is a 5K run/walk and also a kid’s run around Lake Nokomis in addition to a day filled with fun activities for all ages, with proceeds benefiting the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation.

Greenway’s Lead the Way Foundation is one of the most highly regarded in the world of professional sports and we have all grown accustomed to our veteran linebacker making headlines for all the right reasons as a result.

His off-field impact resulted in him being named the 2015 winner of the NFLPA’s Byron Whizzer White Award which is a recognition of all the various ways the Greenway family have given back to help those in need.

There are prizes and t-shirts available to registered participants in addition to autograph opportunities. The event is scheduled for June 21st with check-in beginning at 7:30 a.m.

If you are interested in registering online, or would like more information, please CLICK HERE. Also, be sure to follow Chad on Twitter for more updates.

This is sure to be a great event, once again, and a reminder that Chad Greenway has always been a Vikings player that can make fans proud off the field.

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    The Vikings legend shares about the Purple People Eaters, outdoor practices, and his best friend Sid.

    Bud Grant Interview
    Blue jeans. One leg crossed over the other. He’s wearing a casual button-down shirt, tan and camo, and he proudly displays two baseball caps within reach. One—Vikings purple—covers silver-white hair, while the other—Winnipeg blue—sits near a can of Tab soda on the card table.

    He’s manning a garage sale, carefully counting out dollar bills and quarters, and it all seems rather ordinary… except he also signs autographs for the visitors.  “Bud Grant. HOF ’94,” he writes. Over and over again. On a worn leather football. The rod of a fishing pole. An old game program.

    Harry “Bud” Grant will forever be known as one of the top coaches in NFL history, and many remember him as the straight-faced coach who soldiered the sidelines and held players to an exceptionally high standard of conduct.

    “I wasn’t that tough,” Grant tells me. “I don’t think so. I suppose you’d have to ask the other players or coaches – I can’t answer that question. We had rules, but it was an easy job, really.”

    He breaks his signature stoic expression for a split second, just long enough for me to question his sincerity. I prod a bit, ask him about the no-heaters rule he implemented during winter games.

    “We had no indoor practice facilities in those days. We had to practice outside, so why not play outside?” He answers matter-of-factly. “We became acclimated, learned to play with no gloves, no heater, no underwear […] so Sunday was easy for us. It was tougher for other teams that wanted to come in and wanted to be warm. We were cold, but we still played.”

    For Grant, it’s all about practicality.

    Case in point, you may not know that the former coach stands alone as the only man to ever play in both the NBA and the NFL. In fact, Grant won the first championship in NBA history with the Minneapolis Lakers. He left the Lakers, however, to join the Philadelphia Eagles as a defensive end. The decision proved a no-brainer.

    “The bottom line was that I could make more money playing football than I could playing basketball,” he explains.

    Grant viewed sports—playing or coaching—as just a job, a way to make one’s living, not concerning himself with the spotlight or the fame. For an icon like Grant, media requests are not uncommon, although he says they now come very few and far between. League reps and cable stations hounded the coach for appearances shortly after his career, asking him to audition for game-day commentary and halftime interviews.

    “I figured out it would be like 24 road trips,” he says, scoffing. “I’m out of this to stay home, not to get on the road again. My ego didn’t need it.”

    Eventually, people just stopped trying.

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    Image courtesy of Vikings.com

    I know, I know… you’re sick of Adrian Peterson, the drama surrounding him, and our inability to not post about it. As true as that might be for a lot of you, I can promise you that we are not exactly enjoying this particular storyline, and we’ll have a very special article posted Friday morning that will be a great chance to take a break from the Peterson nonsense.

    Seriously, you’ll want to be here tomorrow morning to witness one of the best, if not the best, articles we’ve ever posted here at VT.

    In the meantime, our star running back took to Twitter Thursday afternoon to vent some frustrations and the result was a cyclone of speculation spewing venom in just about every possible direction.

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